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Weird Tuesday, June 1st 2010 at 2:15 pm

Meet the Aluminum Foil-and-Cardboard Porsche

Artist Hannes Langeder has daringly spoofed excess and car culture with the Ferdinand GT3 RSX, a mock Porsche that looks great and can make the claim to be the “world’s slowest Porsche.” He’s even brought it out to the track to test the claim, where a sunglassed announcer in a cream-colored suit hypes it up before revealing that it’s actually powered by a hidden bicycle.

The aluminum foil Porsche is currently on display at the Museum of Art Linz in Austria. Most righteously, it’s even inspired an essay by a philosophy professor at the University of Vienna, which is reproduced on Hannes Langeder’s website. A snippet run through Google Translate, from which you can get the gist (fast juxtaposed with slow) and also marvel at translation-proof words like “StaßenbenützerInnen.”

The object of art to be understood as a deliberate contribution to the deceleration. It is here not to ring the joke (ha, ha, who now travels with the sports car-rickshaw!). It rather undermines Hannes Langeder the futuristic ideology of the machine and the speed of glory: With an art form that is not immediately reveal themselves as such and thus removed from the area everyday, into museums. It is to stimulate a bicycle Porsche just to the presence in this public space, therefore, to reflect on the possible transformation of our world, and so enter into a dialogue with other StaßenbenützerInnen to. The Gehzeug of the transport planner Knoflacher comes to mind, that portable frame with the size of a car that is by diagonal cables for a people easy to carry. With it can pedestrians in the flow traffic lane on the roadway and slow down the traffic. The Gehzeug is a brilliant demonstration object in the truest sense, his direction has clearly propagandist in nature and will point out the absurdity of our means of transportation.

A gallery of more photos from the artist, if you’re interested.

(h/t Jalopnik)

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