comScore

biology

  1. Science

    How Your Body Fights Viruses: An Animation [Video]

    Okay, wait. Your body doesn't fight viruses with an animation. Otherwise Osmosis Jones would be required viewing for all biology classes, and nobody wants that. But as this TED-Ed video explains using easy-to-understand visual metaphors, the way your cells create antibodies to fight off invading viruses is pretty ingenious.

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  2. Science

    Biologists Discover The Giantest Of All Giant Squirrels

    Forget Megashark vs. Giant Octopus - we've got something even more terrifying to occupy your nightmares, and this one really exists. A team of biologists, apparently determined to make the world uncomfortable, has found a new species of flying squirrel which is the biggest squirrel species ever - and this sucker is big.

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  3. Science

    Poo-Sniffing-Dog Helps Biologists Monitor Animal Populations

    Tucker is a poo-sniffing-canine-biology-detective, which sounds like the title of a new Nickelodeon TV Series -- although they'd probably drop "poo sniffing" from the title (I mean, he's a dog. We get it). In real life, though, Tucker really does sniff out the poo of other animals for science instead of standard dog reasons.

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  4. Weird

    Just When You Thought it Was Safe: Disembodied Snake Heads Can Function, Bite Themselves

    Not too long ago we learned that turtles can live happy healthy lives with two heads, and now we know that a snake's head will bite its body right before dying. If you didn't think snakes could be more horrifying, check out this video and get ready to be proven wrong. I highly suggest listening to "Snake Eater" while watching.

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  5. Science

    Apes Apparently Use The Breaststroke While Swimming Just Like We Do

    On TV and in movies, you can see various types of primates doing all kinds of athletic things like climbing trees, swinging from vines, even playing hockey. But swimming? That's pretty rare, but it happens.. Allow Cooper the chimpanzee and Suryia the orangutan to demonstrate their swimming technique for you.

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  6. Science

    Open Worm Wants You to Help Build an Electronic Model of a Living Creature

    There are plenty of things about the world of biology that remain a mystery to us, but if you're looking for a creature that researchers understand very well, you could do worse than Caenorhabditis elegans. A microscopic worm that is one of the simplest lifeforms on the planet, C. elegans is also one of the most thoroughly studied. While researchers have a ton of data, a team of scientists is spearheading a project they hope can offer an unprecedented look into the inner workings of this little worm -- they want to build a full, working, digital model of the creature they can run research simulations on, and they want your help to do it. 

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  7. Science

    Barnacles Throw Sperm At One Another To Reproduce

    Since they spend their entire lives glued to one spot -- be it a rocky shore or the hull of your uncle's fishing boat -- barnacles have had to develop breeding techniques that let them get a little action without leaving the comfort of home. Those techniques, from the hermaphroditism that is common in most barnacle species to the enormous penises -- as long as four times the length of their own body -- boasted by the creatures have long fascinated researchers studying sex in the animal kingdom. One species of barnacle, though, has just been found to demonstrate a never-before-seen sexual behavior that will have biology students giggling into their textbooks for years to come. The practice, in which barnacles produce sperm and simply fling it into the water hoping for the best, is known as spermcasting, and if it's found to be widespread in other species, it could rewrite the book on barnacle sex.

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  8. Science

    Guinea Pig Turned Into Living Battery, The Matrix One Step Closer To Just Being Our Lives

    You may think of guinea pigs as just furry little machines designed to process alfalfa into poop, but they are so much more than that! They are furry little poop machines that also make convenient batteries, like potatoes, that have fur and squeal! It's not just them, either -- pretty much any mammal can be turned into a battery, courtesy of our highly conductive inner ears, meaning the plot of The Matrix just got more plausible.

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  9. Weird

    The Sims x A Billion: Sea Urchin Embryonic Development Fully Modeled by Computer

    Researchers at Caltech have created the first predictive computer model of a living embryo, mapping the genetic development of a sea urchin in the first 30 hours of it's life. While a model over that time span will miss big events like the urchin's high school graduation and the heartbreak of its first divorce, it will capture the development of it's heart and skeleton, which are pretty important too. The work, reported in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science opens the door to creating predictive computer models for other organisms down the road, and learning more about the very first moments of development, when cells are still learning what to be from the simplest available genetic roadmap.

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  10. Science

    Ants Are Basically the Internet but More Harmful to Picnics

    On their own, ants are pretty stupid, but when they are all working together, they can be unnervingly clever, capable of building elaborate nests, making bridges and rafts from their own bodies, and even creating their own primitive aphid ranches. As it turns out, even the Internet itself is taking some unexpected lessons from the world of hymenoptera. When biologists and computer scientists from Stanford University put their heads together to try and learn more about how ant colonies make the decision to send out foragers for food, they found that the decision-making process is remarkably similar to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) -- the method by which websites determine how much bandwidth they can spare for a file transfer.

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