comScore

Birds

  1. Science

    T-Rex Didn’t Even Need Its Stupid Baby Arms

    We've all had a good laugh at the Tyrannosaurus Rex's tiny little arms. Well the joke's on us apparently. New research shows that T-Rex didn't even need its stupid little baby arms anyway. Turns out its neck did all the work.

    Read on...
  2. Science

    Testosterone in Part of a Bird’s Brain Makes Them Sing More, but Doesn’t Help Them Mate Successfully

    Male canaries woo potential mates with song, and a new study shows that delivering testosterone to one part of the bird's brain increases the frequency with which the bird sings, but doesn't improve how well they sing. They can basically talk to women, but don't necessarily know what to say.

    Read on...
  3. Science

    Contrary to Popular Belief, Lake Natron Does Not Instantly Turn Birds To Stone

    Sometimes the media does this thing where it takes something incredibly fascinating and turns into a crappy game of telephone, and at the end everybody believes something completely fake. Case in point: after those gorgeous pictures of mummified Lake Natron birds made the rounds, now everybody thinks that the lake has supernatural gorgon-like powers.

    Read on...
  4. Science

    Learn About Behavioral Patterns of the European Robin As Reenacted By Ridiculous Humans [Video]

    Remember those "Cat friend vs. Dog friend" videos that made the rounds a while back? Imagine if you'd actually learned something about animal behavior from that series instead of just laughing at how accurate it is -- that's what this video from Pleated-Jeans is. Now you'll know everything you need to about the European Robin's territorial nature.

    Read on...
  5. Science

    High-Speed Cameras Create Beautiful Slow-Motion Bird Videos for Science

    We know birds can fly, because they do, but we don't know much about how they fly. It probably has something to do with their wings. Part of the problem with studying birds is that they move much faster than we do. That's why students at Stanford University have been using high-speed video cameras to capture slow motion video of birds in flight. The resulting video is really quite beautiful.

    Read on...
  6. Science

    Seagulls May Be Killing Dozens of Baby Whales Off the Coast of Argentina

    Last year, researchers found 116 dead right whales in the waters off of Argentina -- all but three of them calves, or immature whales. That marked a startling doubling of whale casualties in the area the year before, and some researchers think they know what is killing the whales -- legions of seagulls who dive bomb the huge animals as they're surfacing for air, making a meal of the whales' nutritious blubber and leaving the aquatic mammals with gashes in their hides up to four inches deep.

    Read on...
  7. Science

    How the Chicken Lost Its Penis

    Researchers have long wondered why evolution robbed many bird species -- like the chicken -- of a piece of anatomy considered pretty key in most of the breeding we're familiar with -- the penis. A new study of a wide range of birds has revealed a key gene that stymies penis growth in males and suggests a few reasons that nixing the penis could be evolutionarily advantageous for the animals, though it does make calling a male rooster a cock among the crueler jokes in the history of time.

    Read on...
  8. Science

    Extinct Solitaire Birds Wings No Good for Flying, Great at Punching

    Julian Hume and Lorna Steel of the Natural History Museum did some digging and found that these famously aggro animals -- about whom little is known -- and found that the giant, flightless pigeons did have a use for their wings after all -- as potentially deadly weapons sporting bone growths as large as ping-pong balls. Covered in a layer of thick skin, these bones would have acted as boxing gloves of sorts for the birds during battles over mates.

    Read on...
  9. Science

    Carl Zimmer Explains Where Feathers Come From in Latest TED-Ed Animation [Video]

    Folks, can we talk about these TED-Ed videos? Because they are becoming some of my favorite things. In this magnificently animated piece, science writer Carl Zimmer waxes poetic on the aesthetic and engineering feats that make feathers so incredible before delivering a point by point walkthrough of what we know about how feathers evolved -- and what we don't. This lesson in how modern birds developed from ancient dinosaurs more or less the perfect thing to distract you from work today, and come on -- it's not like you're here because you desperately want to get things done.

    Read on...
  10. Science

    These Little Birds Squawk to Attract Predators, Blackmail Their Parents for Food

    As was pointed out in The Walking Dead, a zombie apocalypse a hungry, crying baby is likely going to attract the undead and put everyone in serious danger. Similarly -- though in less apocalyptic circumstance -- the loud squawks of a hungry young pied babbler can blackmail the baby bird's parents into feeding it pronto, before predators also hear their cries. This will be a scenario familiar to anyone who has been exposed to the phenomenon of 'Italian guilt' in their lifetime: "Hey, if you don't come feed me quick, I guess maybe you want predators to eat me. No, it's fine. I guess you can always have more babies."

    Read on...
  11. Tech

    Getting This Close-Up of a Cassowary May Be Photography’s Most Dangerous Game

    In the wilds of Australia and New Guinea, there is a dinosaur-like bird that probably wants to hurt you.  It's probably thinking about it right now, in fact.  To be fair, it's only because it assumes you want to tangle with it -- which you totally don't. But in the name of conservation, some are willing to. Photographer Christian Ziegler risked life and limb to photograph the Southern cassowary in Black Mountain Road, Australia. It's even won him the top award in the 2013 World Press Photo of the Year.

    Read on...
  12. Science

    Thieves Steal Emu From Australian Wildlife Park, Leave Staff More Confused Than Angry

    Staff at Australia's Featherdale Wildlife Park are scratching their heads over the recent theft of one of their emus. How the bird burglars carried a bird the size of a small ostrich over an electrified barbed wire fence in the dead of night while avoiding a guard and security camera is one good question, but there's an even better one -- why would anyone steal an emu in the first place?

    Read on...
  13. Science

    Killer Kitties: United Kingdom House Cats Threaten Local Bird Populations

    In a recent survey from across the pond that may dampen the Internet's unwavering devotion for funny felines, scientists have concluded that domestic cats in the United Kingdom are posing a serious threat to local bird populations, which has steadily declined over the years. Conservationists have since been trying to convince obstinate cat owners to be more mindful of their pet's hunting behavior and look into options that would prevent any more birds winding up dead on their doorsteps. If action to protect native bird species isn't taken soon, the U.K. is going to be known as the crazy cat lady of the world.

    Read on...
  14. Science

    Birds Respond Emotionally to Music Just as Humans Do

    Scientists have long debated the topic of whether or not the melodious chirping that constitutes birdsong qualifies as music. But the results of a study conducted by then Emory University undergraduate Sarah Earp and neuroscientist Donna Maney have shown that birds, namely the monitored behavior of the white-throated sparrows used in the analysis, exhibit similar neural activity that humans do when listening to music that is either acoustically pleasurable or a discordant mess that pains the ear drums -- such as listening to Björk. Not only does this mean we share a mutual admiration for the musical arts with our feathered friends, but also that scientific discoveries are gradually turning our world into a wonderful fantasy land seen only in animated Disney movies.

    Read on...
  15. Weird

    Cigarette Butts Help Bird Nests Repel Parasites

    No one likes seeing cigarette butts strewn about city streets. No one, that is, except maybe urban birds. New research shows bird nests that incorporated cigarette butts may be repelling unwanted parasites. It turns out the deadly chemicals contained in cigarettes may provide a useful service for birds. Based on known bird behaviors, it's also possible that birds are seeking out cigarette butts to put in their nests to repel pests.

    Read on...
© 2014 Geekosystem, LLC   |   About UsAdvertiseNewsletterJobsPrivacyUser AgreementDisclaimerContactArchives RSS

Dan Abrams, Founder