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bugs

  1. Weird

    How, Uh, Romantic? Name a Bronx Zoo Cockroach After Your Sweetheart for Valentine’s Day

    Looking for a last minute Valentine's Day gift that's really unique? For just a $10 donation to the zoo, you can immortalize your sweetheart by naming one of the Bronx Zoo's 58,000 Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches after them. You'll even get a fancy certificate you can send to remind them of what you've done, even if reminding anyone you care about that you named a roach after them doesn't seem like an advisable thing to do. You've got to give the zoo points for novelty on this one, because no one -- and I mean no one -- expects to be indelibly linked to a huge, noisy terror-bug for Valentine's Day.

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  2. Science

    Seeing Is Believing: Just Looking At Ants, Bug Bites Can Make You Itch

    Does the picture above make your skin crawl? You're not alone. A recent study conducted by the University of Manchester found that visual cues -- such as being shown an image of an ant or a bug bite -- can provoke an itch response in people, even if they haven't felt a thing. In fact, you may not even need to see the itch inducing stimulus, as the same study found that just seeing another person scratch can make viewers feel that they also have an itch to scratch, suggesting that itching, like yawning, may be a socially contagious response.

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  3. Tech

    The Newest Version of Android Dislikes The Holidays, Doesn’t Include December

    The end of the year can a be a very lonely time for a smartphone. When the holidays roll around, people tend to get together with their families and speak to each other in person, so the phones just sit there in their owners' pockets or on a table somewhere. Well, after years of abuse, Android-based phones have decided they aren't going to take it anymore. As a sign of protest, (or because of unforeseen bug) Android Jelly Bean 4.2 skips the month of December, 2012 in certain apps.

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  4. Science

    Photosynthesizing Bugs Can Channel the Power of the Sun

    A new study has revealed that the pea aphid may be the only type of animal to use photosynthesis to collect and store energy. Alain Robichon, an entomologist from the Sophia Agrobiotech Institute in Sophia Antipolis, France, built his research on the findings of Nancy Moran; she discovered that the aphids had the gene to produce carotenoids in the first place. The pea aphid was already among nature's oddest creatures for a bunch of reasons. For example, did you know they can be born pregnant?

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  5. Science

    New Insect Species Discovered on Flickr

    The Semachrysa jade, a type of lacewing indigenous to the jungles of Malaysia, was only recently confirmed to be an entirely new species. The story of how scientists came to find the insect, first published in the newest issue of academic journal Zookeys last month, explains that the little bug wasn't actually discovered in the wild -- but on the Internet.

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  6. Science

    World’s Smallest Fly May Also Be World’s Smallest Decapitator

    A new species of fly was recently discovered in Thailand and now holds the title of the world's smallest fly. Entomologists suggest that this fly might also hold the title of the world's smallest decapitator. Ants the world over, beware! Euryplatea nanaknihali will hunt you, find you, and mount your head over its fireplace.

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  7. Weird

    These Insect-Based Foods Actually Look Pretty Good

    See those sushi-like cubes on that stylish tray? They're made of bugs: A mix of honey caterpillar croquettes and other processed insect treats. They are the products of Ento, a design by a group of U.K. students aimed at convincing the average shopper to add some insects into their diet. Now, you might think that eating insects is a measure of last resort, but there are some pretty compelling reasons why bugs should probably be on your dinner table.

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  8. Gaming

    The Worst, Best, and Weirdest Chess Sets

    In the 12th century, someone somewhere in Scandinavia carved the Lewis Chessmen, a collection of nearly 100 chess pieces of a particularly unique and expressive style. It wasn't the first ornate chess set, but it's certainly a strange and unique set with its shield-biting berzerkers and worried looking royalty. Since the Lewis chess set, the Western world has continued to make stranger and stranger chess sets. Perhaps this speaks to the power of the game, and it's captivating metaphorical nature. More likely it speaks to the human desire to spend stupendous amounts of money. Regardless, chess set making has come to the point where it's no longer about the game but about whatever weird twist you can put on it. And trust us, they've come a long way from simple walrus ivory carvings. So whether your covet these gameboards, or laugh at those that do, please enjoy this humble collection of the least humble chess sets the Internet has to offer.

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