comScore

Buildings

  1. Entertainment

    MIT Students Play Tetris on a Building

    Over the weekend, a group of MIT students performed a feat that isn't exactly unique, but generally impressive when coherently completed: They turned the outside of a building into a large game of Tetris. The students performed the feat on MIT's Green Building, which is home to the MIT Earth and Planetary Sciences department. Players could move, rotate, and drop blocks, but there was a twist as the player progressed through the levels.

    Read on...
  2. Science

    Videos From The Sendai Earthquake

    We live in a highly connected age, with millions of cameras and an extremely vibrant news industry, that is able to put eyes on even the most harrowing events and bring them to the world. That was especially apparent today when after a record-setting earthquake struck Japan, videos and news coverage poured out of the country. For those of us far away from today's events, these images are likely to be the indelible images that we remember. This first video, from the BBC, shows a terrifying and amazing scene, taken not long after the tsunami hit the coast of Japan this morning, showing a boat caught in a huge whirlpool. Commentators on the video and other sources say that this was likely caused by the interaction between the forward rushing water and the sea floor. There's no word, as of yet, as to whether the boat was occupied or not.

    Read on...
  3. Tech

    China Builds a 15-Story Building in Six Days

    This hotel was built in Changsha, China over the course of less than a week. Now, before you make plans to never stay there ever, it was put together out of prefab pieces that had been built off site and simply needed to be put together. It's soundproof, insulated, and earthquake proof, although if you have changed your mind by now, you might want to wait at least a little bit. The Yahoo! News article says nothing about interior furnishings, much less beds.

    Read on...
  4. Entertainment

    The Building Made from Thousands of Books

    Slovakian-born artist Matej Kren designed this dizzying structure made of thousands of books as an installation for Bologna's Museum of Modern Art.

    Titled Scanner, the narrowness of the piece, which is large enough for people to walk through and which is lined with mirrors, is meant to "evoke a sensation of sublime terror, an alteration referring to a puzzling infinity itself created to destabilize conventional spatial habits. Mirrors become an instrument to create illusion and, at the same time, to unmask it. Since the public can easily see themselves reflected in a false infinite – thus discovering the illusion – the problem becomes the latency of perception."

    Read on...
© 2014 Geekosystem, LLC   |   About UsAdvertiseNewsletterJobsPrivacyUser AgreementDisclaimerContactArchives RSS

Dan Abrams, Founder