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Cassini Orbiter

  1. Space

    First Image of Saturn from Cassini Probe Is Available For Viewing, You Can’t Even See Any Of Us In It

    Remember how we told you to all stand outside your houses and wave at the sky between 5:27 and 5:42 EDT (2:27 to 2:42 PDT) on Friday afternoon, because NASA’s Cassini probe would be snapping a picture of Saturn in which Earth would be visible? Yeah, you probably didn't have to actually do that, because all we can see are little white dots, which is how we look in the photograph above. It's still a pretty cool picture, but we can't help thinking maybe you should have waved harder. Y'know. For science.

    Read on...
  2. Space

    New Images Of Saturn’s Polar Vortex Are Thoroughly Ridiculous

    This is a composite images taken by NASA's Cassini probe of the enormous, swirling storm that dominates Saturn's north pole earlier this week. We've seen images of the storm, before, but never gotten this much detail on it and...man, just wow.  Keep reading for an even bigger image of the monster cyclone, which is estimated to meausure up to 4,000 kilometers across. That's about 2,500 miles, meaning that the vortex you're looking at would span the distance between New York City and Los Angeles.

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  3. Space

    Saturn’s Moon Titan is Slushy All the Way Down

    A new look at Saturn's satellite reveals that beneath its icy crust and lakes of liquid methane is a slushy mixture of ice and rock. This new data is suggested by readings of Titan's gravity field made by very precise measurements of its effect on the movements of NASA's Cassini Orbiter. Scientists say this means that Titan "never got hot enough to separate out into a core, mantle, and crust." We only have one question. Blue-Raspberry?

    Read on...
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