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Colors

  1. Entertainment

    Okay, But Why Isn’t The Giver Trailer Filmed in Black and White? [Video]

    Hey, so, did all of you guys in the film industry read the same book that we all read in middle school? Because call me crazy, but I kind of thought the whole point was that nobody in the Community could see color. Why am I looking at colors right now, Jeff Bridges? Explain to me why colors are a thing, please. That is your literal job as Giver.

    Read on...
  2. Science

    Can We Ever Really Know if Red is Red? [Video]

    It's kind of a classic stoner question. Are the colors I see the same as the colors you see? Is there any way of knowing? Strawberries look red like the one on the left, but how do you know the one on the right isn't what I'm seeing as red? The question has puzzled first semester philosophy students for times immemorial. Thankfully, Vsauce is on the case to answer the question once and for all, or at least to explain why the question is such a difficult one.

    Read on...
  3. Entertainment

    OK Go’s New Video for “Skyscrapers” Doesn’t Have a Rube Goldberg Machine, but is Very Pretty [Video]

    We've always loved OK Go -- yes, before the treadmill video -- and they have always delivered both musically and visually. Their new video, for the song "Skyscrapers," isn't as visually impressive as one of their Rube Goldberg machines, or driving a car into stuff and having the noise of the collisions compose a song, but it is mellow and very pretty. Watch and chill out, as this couple dances through color.

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  4. Science

    Hey, Girls and Preppy Guys At Business Conferences, Your Favorite Color Doesn’t Exist

    Short, informative video maker MinutePhysics is back, and is here to tell 9-year-old girls and guys wearing power shirts at business conferences everywhere that their favorite color, pink, doesn't actually exist. So, put down your Barbies and unpop your collars, sit back, and let MinutePhysics explain that our brains make up the color pink because it doesn't know how else to perceive the light that should go in pink's place.

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  5. Science

    The Everlasting Gobstopper of Tables Gets More Colorful the More You Wreck It

    Artist Ed Swan's Mark Marker table is made up of ashwood with more than fifty different-colored layers of paint. What this means is that as its drab gray exterior gets beaten up, vibrant colors and cool patterns are revealed, making it a sort of Everlasting Gobstopper of tables. Swan encouraged visitors to sand away at his table at a recent London exhibition, and plans to seal off the finished product with clear lacquer to preserve the patterns revealed. Video demo below:

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  6. Science

    One Shaker, One Pour, Nine Different-Colored Drinks

    The drinks change color while they're being poured! Though probably achieved by "floating" or "layering," a process by which liquids of different densities can sit atop one another, the video is still pretty neat to watch. There's too many double rainbow jokes here to pick one.

    (via The Daily What)

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  7. Tech

    Blue and Red Are the Most Powerful Colors on the Web

    COLOURLovers has conducted a fascinating study of the dominant colors on the Internet by analyzing the palettes used by the top 100 brands on the web as determined using Alexa, Compete, and Nielson ratings. Their findings, as you can see in the graphic above: Blue and red dominate, while other colors like green and purple are relatively rare.

    Why? There may be no shortage of pop-psych explanations for this color distribution -- say, that red symbolizes power and authority, or that blue stands for safety and modernity. But the author of the post points out that many of the companies in question have stuck with the same basic color scheme since they were scrappy startups, unaided by branding research: Mark Zuckerberg, COLOURLover notes, claims to have made Facebook's color scheme blue because he himself is red-green colorblind, a fact corroborated in his recent New Yorker profile. Then again, when Wired analyzed the colors of corporate America in 2003, they also found that red and blue prevailed.

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