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Coronal Mass Ejection

  1. Space

    Sun Continues Impressive Activity, Tosses Coronal Mass Ejections at Earth

    If you weren't already aware, the Sun's been seeing a whole lot of action of late. Like, it's still being the Sun, but it's also putting out incredible X-class solar flares, complete with coronal mass ejections. The latter doesn't necessarily require the former, though, and that's where we find ourselves at currently. Thanks to a couple of coronal mass ejections yesterday, there's a good chance we're going to get some geomagnetic storm activity over the next few days.

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  2. Space

    Sun Erupts With Three X-Class Flares in One Day, Complete With Coronal Mass Ejections

    The Sun is ramping up towards its peak activity in its 11-year-cycle, and it's doing so in a big way. In one 24-hour period, the Sun has erupted with three progressively more intense X-class solar flares from the same region, each with its own coronal mass ejection. The CMEs are not heading in the direction of Earth, but could affect some spacecraft.

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  3. Space

    Watch Four Hours of This Month’s Solar Storm in Three Beautiful Minutes

    Earlier this month there was a large M1-class solar flare near an Earth-sized sunspot known as AR1692, and the resulting Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) washed over the Earth two days later on March 17th. The event resulted in a massive Aurora Borealis display that photographer Göran Strand captured, and he compressed the four-hour event down to a beautiful three minutes.

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  4. Space

    Coronal Mass Ejection: The Sun Just Spat At Us

    This is the sun. For a long time, it was sleepy, lying idly in the sky, keeping us warm and cozy here on Earth. Well, now the sun is waking up after its slumber, and it wants us to know. So it's spitting at us, via a coronal mass ejection. The sun's surface erupted, sending huge amounts of plasma into space ... toward us. For reference in the image above, the eruption is the dark arc near the top of the star, not the bright patch nearer the middle. But don't worry, everyone. While the sun can and someday will bring about the apocalypse, this isn't that moment. There will be pros and cons to this event, which should start as soon as tonight and last into tomorrow. Let's start with the bad news: Some satellite communications could be disrupted. The good news: Light show! This kind of plasma attack could create a geomagnetic storm, which sounds terrifying, but would really just mean we'd get to see the Northern Lights, except they'd be all over the lower 48 states.

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