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Creative Commons

  1. Entertainment

    Happy Birthday, @girlvsplanet! We Got You Free Creative Commons License Birthday Songs

    It seems like most of our Twitter followers were afraid to admit it was their birthday yesterday, but they're missing out. We found out it was @girlvsplanet's birthday, and we got them a gift!

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  2. Tech

    Documentary On The Pirate Bay Now Available On The Pirate Bay Because Of Course It Is

    TPB AFK, a documentary chronicling the brief but tumultuous life of everyone's favorite torrent site, The Pirate Bay, debuts today at the Berlinale Film Festival in Germany. But the film is making a more notable, if less orthodox, premiere today as well -- it's available for anyone who cares to to download it right from The Pirate Bay. Whatever you may say about the film itself, credit where credit's due -- director Simon Klose knows his audience. Check out the trailer after the jump.

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  3. Tech

    Doing It Right: California Passes Creative Commons Textbook Legislation

    The textbooks for college courses can cost a pretty penny, especially if the publishers keep putting out a new edition year after year. Even if students manage to find someone to purchase their used copies, it's still a losing proposition for the average student. That all might change soon in California. Governor Jerry Brown has signed legislation that will eventually provide free, open-source digital textbooks for 50 of the state's most popular courses.

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  4. Tech

    YouTube Now Supports Creative Commons Licensing, Remixing

    Beginning at noon ET today, YouTube will roll out a new Creative Commons designation within the YouTube Video Editor which will allow video uploaders to license their work under the CC-By-3.0 license or to browse through a library of "over 10,000 Creative Commons videos," including some uploaded by C-SPAN, PublicResource.org, Voice of America, and Al-Jazeera. Especially neat is the set of possibilities this will open up for video remixers. Video uploaders who designate their work as Creative Commons allow other YouTube users to easily share and remix it, with proper credit, and would-be remixers will have access to an ever-expanding library of stuff to work with. This doesn't mean that those ever-present pirated Naruto and Family Guy clips on YouTube will suddenly belong to Creative Commons, however: According to Mashable, YouTube hopes that the addition of CC licensing will "help YouTubers get even more creative with their content — in a manner that protects the rights of all content creators," and "anyone who tries to circumvent that rule [that users can only mark their own work as CC] will be subject to YouTube’s copyright protection services." (via Boing Boing, Mashable)

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