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harpercollins

  1. Tech

    Department of Justice Takes a Bite Out of Apple With Guilty Verdict in eBook Price Fixing Case

    Just a reminder: It's illegal for companies to work together to artificially control the price of goods -- even when one of those companies is Apple. The Department of Justice's (DOJ) price fixing case against Apple has come to a guilty verdict. Now I bet they wish they had settled like all the other defendants in the case.

    Read on...
  2. Entertainment

    Ice and Fire Encyclopedia Delayed Because George R.R. Martin Can’t Stop Writing

    Fans of the long-running A Song of Ice and Fire series (those are the books that Game of Thrones is based on, if you didn't know) were probably a little miffed when they heard that George R.R. Martin was working on a companion book called The World of Ice and Fire Encyclopedia instead of, you know, finishing the series. Well prepare to be more miffed (miffed-er?), because the release date has already been pushed back to 2014, and it's now going to be a multi-volume "lushly illustrated retelling" of Westerosi history. Which, to be fair, sounds awesome, but we would have settled for an encyclopedia. Or The Winds of Winter. Whichever.

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  3. Tech

    U.S. Files Antitrust Suit Against Apple Regarding eBook Prices

    A month ago, Apple and five other publishers were warned that the U.S. Department of Justice was seeking a case for collusion and price fixing regarding eBook prices. Now, it would seem those warnings weren't full of hot air, as the Department of Justice has officially filed a lawsuit against Apple, Hachette Book Group, Simon & Schuster, HarperCollins, Macmillan, and Penguin, claiming that these publishers colluded to fix eBook prices. Word on the people familiar with the matter street says Simon & Schuster, Hachette Book Group, and HarperCollins already settled their suits, but Apple and Macmillan have refused to engage in talks, and deny that they have participated in an collusion to fix eBook prices.

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  4. Entertainment

    Department of Justice Warns Apple, Publishers Regarding eBook Collusion and Price-Fixing

    According to a report on The Wall Street Journal, the Department of Justice has taken notice of eBook publishing and pricing. Federal prosecutors have sent letters to Apple, Simon & Schuster, Hachette Book Group, Penguin Group, Macmillan, and HarperCollins, stating that the Department of Justice is seeking a case for collusion and price-fixing. Aside from potentially reading about a possibly long legal battle, what consumers could expect from this is, intriguingly, lower eBook prices.

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  5. Tech

    Lawsuit Accuses Apple and Publishers of Price Fixing to Stunt Kindle’s Growth

    Apple, along with book publishers HarperCollins, Hachette, Mcmillan, Penguin and Simon & Schuster are now involved in a class-action lawsuit that accuses them of colluding to fix prices in order to hurt Amazon's Kindle success. The lawsuit, being brought by a Seattle law firm, suggests that all the parties involved had reason to be afraid of Amazon's pro-consumer pricing scheme for both its hardware and for eBooks. The logic of the case goes something like this: Publishers were concerned about lost profits from the sale of Amazon's eBooks, Apple was concerned that the Kindle could seriously damage the iPad's viability as an eBook reader, and therefore, the two teamed up to fix prices to try and thwart Amazon's eBook endeavors.

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  6. Tech

    HarperCollins Builds Auto-Destruct Into Library eBooks

    Let's pretend we live in a world where digital objects are forced to reflect the utility of a real-world analogue. For instance, we could say that this blog is a lot like a newspaper, and require that it be sold at news stands, get ink on your fingers, would require the destruction of an entire forest, and only be durable to last a few days. "This world is ludicrous!" I hear you cry. But this is the world in which book publisher HarperCollins wants us to live.

    The Pioneer Library System of Oklahoma has posted an open letter to their blog in which they reveal that the eBooks that HarperCollins makes available to the library for its (groundbreaking, and totally amazing sounding) digital loan program will self-destruct after 26 checkouts.

    Read on...
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