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Journal of Neuroscience

  1. Science

    Apps That “Train Your Brain” Work, but Only Make You Better at Playing Them

    Games like Nintendo's Big Brain Academy and apps like Lumosity promise to help you train your brain, but a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience says such brain training activities only work at improving your ability to do the activities themselves.

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  2. Science

    Hormone Could Keep Married Men Loyal To Their Wives

    While it's too late to save the late, great General David Petraeus from his philandering ways, future generations of men could be in luck. While the Lord may have made a rambling man, research suggests that a quick shot of the hormone oxytocin could be just what the doctor ordered for married men who want to keep their vows sacred while being constantly confronted with women they could conceivably have sex with. Which to most men is, yes, all women.

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  3. Science

    Bionic Whiskers Could Teach Humans A New Sense

    Have you even wondered  what life would be like if you could SEE with your BEARD? No? Us neither, until we came across a paper released recently in the Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers at the Weizmann Institute in Israel are teaching blindfolded subjects an entirely new sense, similar to one rats and mice use to orient themselves in space with their whiskers. To bring about this new form of sensory input in humans, they're using a set of bionic whiskers made for people.

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  4. Science

    The Worst Sound in the World is a Knife Scraping a Bottle

    Researchers at Newcastle University wanted to learn more about why our brains make us recoil from unpleasant sounds like nails on a chalkboard or screaming. So they looked at the brains of a group of volunteers (who no doubt regretted their decision after this test) and played them a series of sounds to find where the recoil response was coming from. They also asked people to rate the sounds they heard from most to least pleasant, leaving them with a (slightly less than definitive because of its small sample size) list of the very worst sounds on the planet. At the top? The sound of a knife scraping a bottle. You can get a look at the rest of the list after the jump.

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  5. Science

    You Remember That Wrong: Brain Distorts Memories Every Time It Recalls Them

    Got a treasured memory? It's okay to get a little sappy, we all do, whether it's that perfect night with a special someone or that dungeon crawl that finally went exactly according to plan. If you're remembering that thing right now, for the love of God, stop! It just won't be the same the next time you recall it. In research that should surprise no one, our brains are constantly betraying us, transforming our memories every time we think about them.

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  6. Science

    Good News, Junkies: Scientists Block Addictive Properties of Opioids, Keep Painkilling Factor Intact

    Anyone who has ever been in the hospital for a major injury knows one incontrovertible fact about morphine: It is pretty damn spectacular. Opioids have been in use as pain relievers for centuries, and we have yet to find anything that is anywhere near as effective at managing physical discomfort. Morphine was the best painkiller surgeons had on hand hundreds of years ago, and it's still among the best today. Its only drawback, really, is that it's too good. The pain releiving qualities of opioids are deeply intertwined with the qualities that make it one of the most addictive substances known to science. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Colorado and Australia's University of Adelaide may have hit the jackpot of pain relief, though. In a paper to be published later this week in the Journal of Neuroscience the team is reporting a breakthrough that lets opioids retain their pain-killing punch while dulling their addictive qualities.

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