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Megaupload

  1. Tech

    New Stats Suggest MegaUpload Actually Helped the Film Industry More Than it Hurt

    Regardless of whether or not you engage in online piracy, I think we can all agree that common sense dictates that the practice would be hurting copyright-holding media companies like record labels and film studios. Well, it seems that, in this case, common sense doesn't hold up under scrutiny. Research from the Munich School of Management and Copenhagen Business School has supposedly gathered statistical evidence indicating that dubious online streamer MegaUpload may have actually helped global box office sales for all but the biggest of blockbusters.

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  2. Tech

    Hackers and Gabon Burst Dotcom’s Bubble, MegaUpload Successor Won’t Use Spiffy Domain As Planned

    Not to be confused with Gaben, which refers to Valve head Gabe Newell, Gabon is a sovereign state located in Africa which just so happens to control the .ga top-level domain. Because Kim Dotcom is clearly a clever wordsmith, it was announced that the upcoming successor to MegaUpload would be called "Mega" and -- you guessed it -- exist at the Me.ga address. It looks like that's not going to happen, though, as both the Gabon government and an anonymous group of hackers have pulled the plug on Me.ga before the service even had a chance to launch.

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  3. Tech

    Dotcom Proposes Funding Fiber Cable From U.S. to New Zealand, Probably Just Legal Posturing

    Here's a question: How do you avoid being extradited to the United States by another government? There's no surefire method of avoiding extradition, but Kim Dotcom might have just scored some brownie points with the New Zealand government. That's assuming they believe his claims, of course. The MegaUpload founder's now proposed reviving the previously shuttered Pacific Fibre cable to connect New Zealand to the United States. You know, if he's not in jail.

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  4. Tech

    MegaUpload Successor May Launch on the Anniversary of Kim Dotcom’s Arrest

    Despite the best efforts of copyright-holders everywhere, it looks like MegaUpload is poised to make a comeback of sorts. The pirate site's founder Kim Dotcom already announced that he's working on a cloud-based successor to the site. Ever the troll, Dotcom now says that he plans to launch his new streaming site, simply entitled "Mega"exactly one year after a SWAT team arrested him during an assault on his New Zealand estate.

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  5. Gaming

    Dotcom Blames Lag on Spying Earlier Than Admitted, Has Best Excuse Ever for Sucking at Multiplayer

    The MegaUpload case continues to seem more like a farce the longer it goes on. Kim Dotcom is now claiming that the New Zealand government was spying on him earlier than they've previously admitted. His evidence? There was a suspicious spike in lag in October -- two months before the Government Communications Security Bureau claims they started spying on him. He's come to the conclusion that this increase was due to the fact that his connection was being rerouted by the government.

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  6. Tech

    Attorney General Refers to MegaUpload Case as Successful, Ignores Legal Blunders Along the Way

    If multiple steps involved in a legal case were ruled as illegal for various reasons, any sane person would be hard-pressed to call that a success. That is, unless that person was only concerned with the ends and not the means. Attorney General Eric Holder is apparently one of those people that aren't too concerned, especially when it comes to the MegaUpload case. In a speech about grants being provided to fight intellectual property crime, Holder referenced MegaUpload as a shining example of what those funds could do.

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  7. Tech

    MegaUpload’s Resurrection is More Important Than it Might Seem

    The MegaUpload fiasco, which has been going on since the beginning of this year, might finally be coming to some sort of an end. The now notorious founder of MegaUpload, Kim Dotcom, announced over Twitter that MegaUpload is almost back from the dead, with its code around 90% completion, and servers on the way.

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  8. Tech

    Court Releases $4.83 Million in Previously Frozen Funds to Dotcom

    It looks like the MegaUpload case could continue on into the foreseeable future after a New Zealand court ruled in Kim Dotcom's favor and released $4.83 million of his previously frozen funds. The majority of this rather large expense relates to legal fees in addition to rent and general upkeep on Dotcom's mansion. Given that $800,000 will be set aside for future legal expenses, Dotcom certainly seems to be in this for the long haul.

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  9. Tech

    Court Rules Kim Dotcom Must be Allowed Access to Evidence Against Him

    In what is increasingly becoming a farce, a New Zealand judge has upheld a ruling that Kim Dotcom, Bram van der Kolk, Mathias Ortmann, and Finn Batato, must be allowed to see the evidence compiled against them in order to properly defend themselves. Essentially, the United States was arguing against letting Dotcom build a compelling defense. Without access to that information, it's hard to say exactly how the extradition hearing would go down. Not well for Dotcom, most likely.

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  10. Entertainment

    MPAA, RIAA Would Like Some Help From the Government in Fighting Piracy, Please

    When copyright czar Victoria Espinel asked for input from the public about what to do about the future of copyright law and the increasing ease of piracy, she couldn't be surprised when the MPAA and RIAA weighed in with their opinions on the matter. Those opinions -- expressed in the form of a 28 page wishlist released last Friday -- are unsurprising. Oh, except for the parts that are completely out of touch with reality -- like the idea that uploading a video you don't have the rights to should be a felony, because it is just like murder. Right? Right. That notion was a non-starter when it was a part of SOPA, but that doesn't mean it's off the organizations' laundry list of turn-ons.

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  11. Tech

    Kim Dotcom Raid Footage Surfaces

    The MegaUpload raid is still a major point of contention. When the site was taken down and founder Kim Dotcom arrested, it was said that the raid made on his sprawling mansion was excessive to the point of lunacy. Officers with semiautomatic rifles and police helicopters were likely not needed for such an operation, even if he were the piracy kingpin groups like the RIAA or MPAA claimed. This broadcast from 3 News has revealed footage of the raid from the police helicopter's point of view.

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  12. Tech

    Kim Dotcom’s Hokey New Single is Self-Indulgent and Dangerous, Still Catchy

    Before all the MegaUpload takedown garbage started, there was a MegaUpload song. It was a weird endorsement of the site, filled with crazy celebrity cameos. It was a goofy little PSA. If you haven't seen it, you really should. Now, Kim Dotcom has dropped another single, and while similarly catchy, it's a lot more serious in tone, serious to the point of being self-defeatingly pompous. The man has some valid points, but it's just, well, see for yourself.

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  13. Tech

    MegaUpload Judge Steps Down After Accusations of Bias

    Kim Dotcom is facing a potential setback in his legal battle, now that Judge David Harvey has taken himself off the contentious case. After commenting that "we have met the enemy and he is US" at a conference, Harvey faced criticism of bias, despite the fact the comment -- in its original context -- had no explicit relation to the ongoing case. Now, a recent announcement suggests Harvey was in fact biased, and aware of the fact, which is why he has now removed himself from the case.

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  14. Tech

    High Court Rules MegaUpload Search Warrants Illegal

    The whole MegaUpload case is far from over, but there's just been a big turn in MegaUpload founder Kim Dotcom's favor. A New Zealand High Court has found that the warrants executed to search Kim Dotcom's house sprawling mansion were actually illegal and as a result, all data acquired in the raid is potentially inadmissible evidence. On top of that, the Court has also ruled that the data exported from New Zealand by the FBI (via copying) was also illegally obtained. Things just got a lot messier for all the prosecutors involved.

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  15. Tech

    FBI Ordered to Copy 150 Terabytes Of Seized MegaUpload Data

    Ever since the big MegaUpload takedown early this year, there's been a question as to what would happen to all the data on the seized servers. In the past six months, much of the data has been in danger of deleltion, and subject to scrutiny by the MPAA, but nothing has really happened to it. Now, a New Zealand High Court has ordered the FBI to prepare to copy the 150 terabytes of data from the seized MegaUpload servers in preparation to provide a copy to Kim Dotcom, for his defense.

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