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Piracy

  1. Tech

    Some Guy Got Detained by the FBI Homeland Security for Watching a Movie Wearing Prescription Google Glass [Updated]

    Last weekend, a man in Columbus, Ohio went to go see Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit with his wife and, in an ironic twist, ended up being interrogated by the FBI Department of Homeland Security for an hour instead. The reason? He was wearing Google Glass.

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  2. Tech

    French File Sharing Law Claims Its First Victim

    After sharing a file or two and ignoring warnings from the government to knock it off, an as-yet-unnamed French Internet user has become the first person fined under France's controversial 'Hadopi' law -- a statute that gives file sharers "three strikes" before swooping in with draconian measures like hefty fines and disruptions in Internet service. In addition to a fine that could be as much as 600 euros, the individual will reportedly have their Internet service cut for up to two weeks.

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  3. Tech

    The Entertainment Industry Wants Congress to Let Them Give You Malware

    The entertainment industry would like you to stop pirating things. They've tried digital rights management, prosecuting file sharers, and even making films like The Last Airbender that were so bad nobody would want to pirate them. Nothing's worked. You jerks keep stealing content, so now the industry is asking Congress to let them install malware on your computer to get you to knock it off.

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  4. Tech

    Anti-Piracy Group Caught Pirating Photos for Their Website

    There are few things more amusing than anti-piracy advocates being caught, well, pirating. It's the best kind of hypocrisy, if that's a thing. That's the situation Canadian anti-piracy company Canipre found themselves in this week after it was revealed that they totally didn't receive permission to use a bunch of the images associated with their website. Oops.

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  5. Tech

    The Pirate Bay Continues Domain Name Hot Potato, Moves to Sint Maarten

    In their attempts to stay one step ahead and whatever legal organizations are currently actively trying to shut them down, the Pirate Bay has a habit of cycling through top-level domains. For example, they had piratebay.se for quite some time, but recently fled to Iceland with piratebay.is. Looks like their time in Iceland might be up, though, as they've apparently fled to piratebay.sx -- Sint Maarten -- in an attempt to avoid any sort of legal shenanigans.

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  6. Tech

    Movie Studios Get Circular, Ask Google to Take Down Their Own DMCA Takedown Requests

    Let's say you're a wealthy, seafaring merchant. You suspect a pirate is sneaking up the hull of your ship to steal your hard-earned doubloons in the hold, so you cry out to the Imperial Navy to arrest the dastardly villain! But when the Imperial pirate-hunter arrives, you panic and call to the Navy to come and arrest him, too -- yeah, the guy who was supposed to arrest the first guy. Well, that's sort of what some movie studios are doing right now. NBC Universal and Lionsgate, among others, are asking Google to take down the takedown requests they themselves had requested, and Google isn't having it.

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  7. Entertainment

    Game of Thrones Season 3 Premiere Sets Piracy Records, HBO Doesn’t Care

    Two big things happened on Easter a few days ago: The Walking Dead season 3 finale and the Game of Thrones season 3 premiere aired at the same time. One of the two was exceptionally good and involved death, swinging blades, and beleaguered humanity, while the other broke a bunch of pirating records. Specifically, the Game of Thrones premiere was uploaded to the Internet and, within a few hours, a tracker reported 163,088 simultaneous downloads of a single torrent of the episode. People sure do like to not pay for things they love!

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  8. Entertainment

    Game of Thrones Director Says Intense Piracy’s Actually Been a Good Thing

    Piracy is something that the television and film industry have to deal with on a regular basis. This is especially true for cable programs that are locked behind subscriptions and those shows that still delay television broadcasts across regions. Shows that do both and aren't available through traditional streaming channels? Well, those shows are going to hit the hardest by piracy. Game of Thrones, for example, has seen extensive piracy thanks to HBO's draconian policies. Director David Petrarca doesn't seem to think this has been an overall bad thing.

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  9. Tech

    Six Strikes And You’re Out: What The Copyright Alert System Means For You

    As of today, three of the major Internet service providers in the United States -- Verizon, Time Warner, and AT&T -- are teaming up with the MPAA and RIAA to let you know that they're watching when you use torrents  to download music, movies or TV shows, and that they don't approve. That disapproval will initially be registered by warnings that remind you that Big Brother your ISP is watching -- the digital equivalent of a disapproving glare -- but that's not the only measure they have at their disposal. Repeat offenders could find themselves blocked from certain sites or even have their connection cut entirely, if temporarily. Keep reading to learn what we know about the new policy, what we don't, and how it could impact the way you use the Internet -- especially if you use it to download media, and come on, who doesn't?

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  10. Tech

    FBI Employees Apparently Big Fans of Piracy, Have Bad Taste in Television

    At this point, is anyone actually surprised to hear that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been caught sharing copyrighted material via BitTorrent? Sure, they have that spiffy anti-piracy emblem, and are in general meant to enforce the law where piracy's concerned, but it certainly seems that pretty much everyone that says they want to stop piracy also has employees that pirate. So, yes, TorrentFreak has found evidence that IP addresses associated with the FBI were pirating, but what's more shocking is their taste in television. Homeland? Really?

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  11. Tech

    Documentary On The Pirate Bay Now Available On The Pirate Bay Because Of Course It Is

    TPB AFK, a documentary chronicling the brief but tumultuous life of everyone's favorite torrent site, The Pirate Bay, debuts today at the Berlinale Film Festival in Germany. But the film is making a more notable, if less orthodox, premiere today as well -- it's available for anyone who cares to to download it right from The Pirate Bay. Whatever you may say about the film itself, credit where credit's due -- director Simon Klose knows his audience. Check out the trailer after the jump.

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  12. Tech

    World Trade Organization Gives Thumbs Up to Antiguan Piracy Site

    Last week we told you about Antigua's plan launch a website to distribute American content while ignoring United States copyright laws. Earlier this week, the World Trade Organization (WTO) the group gave Antigua the green light to move forward with the pirate website that Antigua still refuses to call a pirate website. To nobody's surprise, representatives from the United States are not happy about this situation.

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  13. Tech

    Antigua Strikes Back: Country Wants to Launch Piracy Website to Punish America

    In retaliation for the United States repeatedly blocking Antigua from hosting online gambling, the country now plans to launch a website that will sell music, movies, and software from U.S. content-makers without paying royalties to the content's U.S. copyright holders. It's not surprising that the Antinguan government denies that the site qualifies as "privacy," and it's even less surprising that the U.S. isn't happy about the site and will try to stop it.

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  14. Tech

    You Wouldn’t Steal a Museum Installation: The Pirate Bay’s First Server Put on Display

    One minute they're up in their room sharing files and the next they're incurring the wrath of intellectual property holders everywhere. This year -- September to be precise -- marks the tenth anniversary of when the equally beloved and despised The Pirate Bay file-sharing site was founded, enabling people the world over to watch and listen to media of all kinds without even having to pay a dime to do so; a quality which really hasn't earned it any popularity points within the film and music industries. To commemorate this milestone in unrepentant copyright infringement, the Computer Museum in Linköping, Sweden has placed the site's very first server on permanent display as a part of its "50 years of file-sharing" wing to be revered by techies, and possibly smashed by crowbar-wielding corporate goons, everywhere. The fact we're treating modern technology with the same respect as ancient religious relics has to be saying something about our current culture.

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  15. Tech

    Major Record Labels, Government Departments Caught Pirating Files on BitTorrent

    Yesterday, we reported that employees of several major movie studios were caught pirating files on BitTorrent. It seems Hollywood isn't alone in its do-as-we-say-not-as-we-do pirating ways. TorrentFreak since revealed that the Big Three music labels, as well as government agencies, and even foreign parliaments were caught red-handed using BitTorrent. This is a little like being told not to smoke by someone while they themselves are lighting a cigarette.

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