comScore

Recording

  1. Tech

    Android Malware Moves From Phone to PC, Listens in on You With Your Own Microphone

    The cyber-security wonks at Kaspersky have raised the alarm on a piece of malware for Android phones. The real target of the virus, though, isn't the phone -- it's the computer users will plug it into. The malware, which was available until recently in the Google Play store, masquerades as simple Android phone clean up apps going by the (slightly ironic) names SuperClean and DroidCleaner. Once the apps made it onto a computer, though, they doesn't clean up so much as clean house, copying sensitive data like photos and contact information to remote servers. That's not unnerving enough for you? Don't worry -- to turn the creep factor up to 11, the malware is also capable of turning on PC microphones to listen in on users and relay along those recordings to its shadowy overlords.

    Read on...
  2. Tech

    D.C. Police Chief Unveils Common Sense Public Recording Policy

    Giving credence that there absolutely are rational people in charge -- in some areas -- is District of Columbia Police Chief Cathy Lanier. Effective July 19th, Lanier issued a general order that defines and prohibits unlawful interference with the public's recording or photography of police activities. It remains to be seen what kind of effect this will have on ground level operations when conflicts inevitably arise, but it's definitely a shift in the right direction.

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  3. Space

    This is What the Perseid Meteor Shower Sounds Like

    Ever wanted to know what a meteor sounds like? Well, wonder no more. The recent 2011 Perseid Meteor Shower was recorded by the U.S. Air Force Space Surveillance Radar in Texas. The sound the meteors made as they filled the sky could make for a good horror movie soundtrack, or maybe just something to play at a high volume and annoy a roommate. The radar station that made the recording is located in Lake Kickapoo, Tx, and is part of the United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM). The purpose of the USSTRATCOM is to detect, track, catalog, and identify artificial objects orbiting Earth. If there were aliens approaching, these guys would be some of the first to know about it, but most of their time is spent watching active and inactive satellites, rocket bodies, or fragments of space debris. Listen to the sound of space with the recording after the jump.

    Read on...
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