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Simon & Schuster

  1. Tech

    Simon & Schuster Adds QR Codes to Books, is Half of a Good Idea

    Publisher and mega-company Simon & Schuster has announced that starting this fall they will be adding phone-scannable QR codes to their print books. You might expect that this would give you access to special content, like videos or even a digital version of the book. You'd be half right, as there are some goodies awaiting scanners, but it's mostly to (wait for it) get you to sign up for their email marketing. Lame.

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  2. Tech

    U.S. Files Antitrust Suit Against Apple Regarding eBook Prices

    A month ago, Apple and five other publishers were warned that the U.S. Department of Justice was seeking a case for collusion and price fixing regarding eBook prices. Now, it would seem those warnings weren't full of hot air, as the Department of Justice has officially filed a lawsuit against Apple, Hachette Book Group, Simon & Schuster, HarperCollins, Macmillan, and Penguin, claiming that these publishers colluded to fix eBook prices. Word on the people familiar with the matter street says Simon & Schuster, Hachette Book Group, and HarperCollins already settled their suits, but Apple and Macmillan have refused to engage in talks, and deny that they have participated in an collusion to fix eBook prices.

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  3. Entertainment

    Department of Justice Warns Apple, Publishers Regarding eBook Collusion and Price-Fixing

    According to a report on The Wall Street Journal, the Department of Justice has taken notice of eBook publishing and pricing. Federal prosecutors have sent letters to Apple, Simon & Schuster, Hachette Book Group, Penguin Group, Macmillan, and HarperCollins, stating that the Department of Justice is seeking a case for collusion and price-fixing. Aside from potentially reading about a possibly long legal battle, what consumers could expect from this is, intriguingly, lower eBook prices.

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  4. Tech

    Lawsuit Accuses Apple and Publishers of Price Fixing to Stunt Kindle’s Growth

    Apple, along with book publishers HarperCollins, Hachette, Mcmillan, Penguin and Simon & Schuster are now involved in a class-action lawsuit that accuses them of colluding to fix prices in order to hurt Amazon's Kindle success. The lawsuit, being brought by a Seattle law firm, suggests that all the parties involved had reason to be afraid of Amazon's pro-consumer pricing scheme for both its hardware and for eBooks. The logic of the case goes something like this: Publishers were concerned about lost profits from the sale of Amazon's eBooks, Apple was concerned that the Kindle could seriously damage the iPad's viability as an eBook reader, and therefore, the two teamed up to fix prices to try and thwart Amazon's eBook endeavors.

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