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State of the Union

  1. Tech

    Tonight’s State of the Union Will Have More Social Media, Probably More Statiness and Unionness as a Result*

    The White House is trying to punch up the State of the Union stream this year with added social media integration. You can tweet all of your nodding and incessant clapping right along with government officials, and you can Vine, Instagram, Tweet, and Facebook—the things hip, young voters like to do—your concerns in an online Q&A session afterwards.

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  2. Science

    Obama Plans 10-Year Project to Map Human Brain

    In his State of the Union address last week, President Obama made several mentions of a commitment to science that caught our attention. Now it seems some details about those plans are surfacing. One area of study he mentioned in his speech was that scientists are working to map the human brain, and it's now being reported that the President wants to launch a decade-long program to create the most detailed map of the active human brain to date.

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  3. Tech

    North Korea Probably Detonated A Nuke This Morning — Here’s What’s Different This Time

    I hope you like things that are scary, because an unstable regime led by an untested young man probably just detonated its latest atomic bomb. All signs this morning point to a successful nuclear bomb test in North Korea, which the country has been threatening for some weeks. The move comes in defiance of the international community -- or as they are known in North Korea, "western devils jealous of the power and virility of glorious leader Kim Jong Un" -- which had urged North Korea not to undertake what is seen by the rest of the world as a clearly provocative and threatening action, probably because it is totally meant that way by North Korea.

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  4. Tech

    Obama Wants High-Speed Wireless for 98 Percent of Americans by 2016

    Yesterday's State of the Union address had a heavy dose of geek as President Obama expressed America's need for further technological innovation. There was a strong focus on "rebuilding for the 21st century" and making sure America keeps pace with other countries -- from both an industrial and scientific standpoint. Most excitingly was Obama's plan for 98 percent of Americans to be covered with wireless high-speed internet in the next five years.

    We're the nation that put cars in driveways and computers in offices; the nation of Edison and the Wright brothers; of Google and Facebook. In America, innovation doesn't just change our lives. It is how we make our living. Within the next five years, we'll make it possible for businesses to deploy the next generation of high-speed wireless coverage to 98 percent of all Americans. This isn't just about faster Internet or fewer dropped calls. It's about connecting every part of America to the digital age. It's about a rural community in Iowa or Alabama where farmers and small business owners will be able to sell their products all over the world. It's about a firefighter who can download the design of a burning building onto a handheld device; a student who can take classes with a digital textbook; or a patient who can have face-to-face video chats with her doctor.
    The White House as a whole has become increasingly up-to-date: following the President's speech, government officials monitored Twitter and Facebook for a Q&A session with we the people, and on Thursday, Obama will be answering user-submitted questions live via YouTube (and we fully hope Obama responds in kind to YouTube's regular demographic).

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