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University of Illinois Urbana Champaign

  1. Science

    Science May Have Just Discovered Why Haters Gonna Hate

    Why are some people just inclined to hate on things? To pick the dumbest, most negative facets of a situation and focus on them exclusively, ignoring anything good that might be there in favor of just ragging on things? According to a new study published this week, we may just be born that way, having a "negative dispositional attitude" from birth.

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  2. Science

    Source of Oceanic Mystery Methane Was Under Noses of Researchers All Along

    Researchers have been seeing methane produced from the world's oceans for years, but like methane produced in a crowded elevator, the source was a minor mystery that annoyed many in the field. But researchers from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign may have finally cracked the secret behind just who dealt the methane being released by the Earth's oceans, and it appears the answer was looking right at them the whole time -- probably being conspicously quiet or pretending to check its email or something. The source seems to be one of the most common microbes in the ocean, Nitrosopumilus maritimus.

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  3. Tech

    Electronic Sensors Stick Like Temporary Tattoos, Present Endless Possiblities

    A team of researchers from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign have developed small electronic devices that can be worn on the skin. These temporary tattoos make the person wearing them a part of the device, that can bend, stretch, and move along with the skin. The researchers were hoping to make less obtrusive medical monitors for special needs patients, like premature babies. But the new sensors have proven so successful they could also be used for a variety of other applications. The idea of making wearable sensors that adhere to the skin seems so easy and useful its surprising no one has developed them before. According to researchers, the major challenge in developing the technology was making the parts of the sensor as flexible and stretchy as skin. To do this, the researchers had to take brittle silicon and make it more bendable by making the sensor incredibly thin. The electronic parts of the sensor, light-emitting diodes, solar cells, transistors, and antennae, were assembled in an S-shape that would allow the circuits to still work when stretched in different directions.

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